England and my heart

So I’ve not long returned from three weeks in England. To say it was the trip of a lifetime would not be over stating things. The primary reason for the trip was to see family, which we did. And in the in between times, we saw plenty of the countryside and the many old, old churches, castles (!!!!) and cottages and threw in some touristy stuff for good measure.

If you know me, you’ll know how much I love old things (which is something my parents are always happy to hear me say) and my imagination kicks into overtime and I’m off writing stories in my head as I roam staircases from the middle ages, tread creaky floorboards and gaze from lead light windows at unspoiled vistas and manicured gardens.

And today, as I sit at home going through all the photos, I am hit with the most exquisite pain of wishing I was in two places at once. We’ve all felt this before, of course, but for me this is the first time it is so acute that it’s almost a physical feeling. And it isn’t just that I met cousins I’d never met and felt an instant affinity with (more on that in a future post!), it was something about the country. The stinging wind on my cheeks, the red leaves of autumn against the muted sky, the crunch of leaves under my boots, the sheer history of nearly everything I laid eyes on – I loved it all. There was a connection that I can’t explain but it is real and it runs deep.

So here’s a little visual sample of some of my memories. I hope you enjoy them 🙂

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7 thoughts on “England and my heart

  1. I’ve long been intrigued with something I read so long ago I don’t remember who it was. He was an English writer living on a farm that had been farmed for 1000 years. He wished he could line up all the owners of that farm and ask the questions he’d wondered about…is that level area through the woods an old road or maybe the path the stream once took? Is the scattering of stones along the present stream just random or were those once the foundation stones of a long-gone cottage? In our country we seem intent on covering up or wiping out those traces of history and I’m always on the lookout for the places where history still peeks out at us, waiting for us to notice.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Oh my goodness – YES! That is exactly what I kept wanting! Here in Australia, we don’t have that much that’s old, compared to countries like England, so it was almost sensory overload for me 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Such beautiful images and sentiments. How amazing would it be to be able to have a home in both places (though you’d probably want to live in them simultaneously!). I’m enthralled by all that is ‘old’ and totally get where you’re coming from with this.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Lovely words and photos, Susannah. I have longed to go to Wales, the land of my fathers, my ancestors on my mom’s side. I don’t know if I’ll ever get there, but I have a feeling I might feel the same way. Right now it’s just a dull ache, nagging at me. I hope to get there with my brother and sis-in-law in 2017.

    Liked by 1 person

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